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This week in the Wall Street Journal, Joann Lublin discussed “What to Do When That Shiny New Job Isn’t the Right Fit.” She cited examples of companies wooing stars with pledges that didn’t materialize and asked whether executives in similar situations should adapt or flee.

As I suggested to Joann during her research for this article, this type of experience happens more often nowadays because business is changing so fast. Choosing to stay without adjusting is an almost surefire way to ensure you’re among the 40% of executives who fail in their first 18 months in a new role.

Executive onboarding is the key to accelerating success and reducing risk in a new job. People generally fail in new executive roles because of poor fit, poor delivery or poor adjustment to a change down the road. They accelerate success by 1) getting a head start, 2) managing the message, 3) setting direction and building the team and 4) sustaining momentum and delivering results.

Read the Full Article on Forbes

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